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Sometimes even we forget that there are places this insanely beautiful on our little slice of Earth. Like an island cave in Scotland where waves echo off natural basalt columns, or a 140–island archipelago off Cornwall where gulls outnumber people. Crazy.

 

Lulworth Cove | Dorset

Located along the Jurassic Coast, Lulworth Cove is a complex network of inlets, caves and landforms shaped over millions of years. In the summer, take a boat to see the iconic Durdle Door rock formation.

Pistyll Rhaeadr Waterfalls | Wales

When you are visiting Wales, the majestic Pistyll Rhaeadr Waterfalls – with the UK’s steepest drop – is a must–see destination. From there, go on to explore the Berwyn Mountains and surrounding hills.

Photo by Peter Barritt / Alamy Stock Photo

Photo by Peter Barritt / Alamy Stock Photo

Lake Windermere | Lake District

The largest natural lake in England is in Cumbria’s charming Lake District National Park. There are 18 islands in the 5.7–square–mile lake, with boat rentals available if you feel like exploring.

Photo by Anna Stowe Landscapes UK / Alamy Stock Photo

Photo by Anna Stowe Landscapes UK / Alamy Stock Photo

Porthcurno Beach | Cornwall

Situated in the far west of Cornwall, Porthcurno Beach is known for its soft, white sand and great swimming and sunbathing. On the cliffs above sits the Minack “clifftop” Theater, an incredible place to see a play. Nearby Pedn Vounder Beach is one of the only nude beaches in Cornwall.

Photo by incamerastock / Alamy Stock Photo

Photo by incamerastock / Alamy Stock Photo

Strathaird | Scottish Highlands

This beautiful peninsula on the Isle of Skye is home to Iron Age Fort Dun Ringill. Strathaird is lightly populated, and a starkly beautiful place to see stunning sunsets without a crowd of fellow watchers.

Photo by robertharding / Alamy Stock Photo

Photo by robertharding / Alamy Stock Photo

Anglesey | Wales

Much of Anglesey’s 125–mile coast is an area of outstanding natural beauty (AONB) – a lovely collection of sand dunes, coves and cliffs, villages and pebble beaches. It’s particularly beautiful in spring, when the clifftops are sprinkled with wildflowers. The Royals love it too. Will and Kate lived in a farmhouse here after their wedding in 2011, while William was stationed at the local RAF base.

Sherwood Forest | Nottingham

Robin Hood hung out here, but these days he’d have plenty of company. Sherwood Forest is popular with city dwellers from nearby Nottingham. Its small patch of old–growth forest includes the Major Oak, said to have been Robin’s retreat in earlier days.

Photo by Tracey Whitefoot / Alamy Stock Photo

Photo by Tracey Whitefoot / Alamy Stock Photo

Lavender Fields | Norfolk

Fields of purple stretch across Norfolk’s lavender country in summer. Beyond the extensive gardens, there’s a distillery for lavender essential oils used in lotions and creams, farm tours, and lavender specialties ranging from candy to candles.

Photo by Peter Phipp / Travelshots.com / Alamy Stock Photo

Photo by Peter Phipp / Travelshots.com / Alamy Stock Photo

Cheddar Gorge | Somerset

Britain’s oldest skeleton was discovered here. Cheddar Gorge has spectacular drops of 450 ft. You can explore the caves with a guide, squeezing through many chambers and a final narrow gap known as the Letterbox.

Photo by Adrian Jessup / Alamy Stock Photo

Photo by Adrian Jessup / Alamy Stock Photo

Isles of Scilly | Cornwall

This archipelago off the southwestern tip of Cornwall is home to stunning wildlife, unspoiled scenery and uncrowded landscapes. The distance from the mainland means darker night skies that are perfect for stargazing. Located off Bryher, the smallest inhabited island of the Isles of Scilly, is Rushy Bay, a must–see for beach lovers.

Photo by Nature Photographers Ltd / Alamy Stock Photo

Photo by Nature Photographers Ltd / Alamy Stock Photo

Ardgartan | Scotland

Set in the Argyll Forest Park, Ardgartan is a popular camping and hiking location with tranquil lochs, majestic mountains, fast–running rivers and marked trails to guide you through the hills.

Photo by Lynne Evans / Alamy Stock Photo

Photo by Lynne Evans / Alamy Stock Photo

Loch Lubnaig | Strathyre, Scotland

A small freshwater loch nestled between two mountains in the Scottish Highlands, Loch Lubnaig is a serene place to rent a canoe. Or bike the trail along its western shore.

Photo by Keith Fergus / Alamy Stock Photo

Photo by Keith Fergus / Alamy Stock Photo

Fingal’s Cave | Scotland

On the uninhabited island of Staffa in the Hebrides, this basalt cave is accessed only by boat. Its natural arch structure creates acoustics that echo the breaking waves, producing a natural cathedral–like atmosphere.

Photo by a-plus image bank / Alamy Stock Photo

Photo by a-plus image bank / Alamy Stock Photo

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